Social Media Role Models

Some great examples of companies using social media to listen and build relationships with their customers include:   

  • Marriott: http://www.blogs.marriott.com
    Bill Marriott blogs because he says “I am able to talk about whatever I want and people are able to talk to me.”
  • Coca-Cola: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/coca-cola?ref=s
    While it didn’t create the original Fan Site on Facebook, the company chose to embrace the creators and work with them instead of being the brand police and taking the site down
  • zappos.com: http://twitter.zappos.com/
    CEO tweets about what he is doing, company happenings and twitter-only specials, and welcomes customer feedback.
  • Walmart: http://site.elevenmoms.com/
    The Elevenmoms blog is comprised of influential female bloggers, unpaid and unsponsored, are given free rein to comment on whatever they want about the retailer and its products.
  • Ford: YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/fiestamovement; Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fiestamovement; Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Fiesta-Movement/73386615309; Twitter: http://twitter.com/fordfiesta
    Ford has chosen 100 “agents” to experience its Fiesta car model and talk all about it on social media. The company has given the agents cars and established social media outlets – but is taking no control of what is said about the car.
  • Goodwill of Greater Washington: Blog: http://dcgoodwillfashions.blogspot.com/; Twitter: http://twitter.com/dcgf
    Goodwill of Greater Washington wanted to make its retail stores more appealing to young professional women who love vintage and inexpensive fashion. The solution included the creation of a blog and use of other social media tools to position the organization as a go-to resource for vintage and contemporary fashion.
  • US Transportation and Security Administration (TSA): http://www.tsa.gov/blog/
    This agency’s blog facilitates an ongoing dialogue on innovations in security, technology and the checkpoint screening process. The average post gets 100 comments and gives the agency tremendous insight into what the public thinks about their policies and actions and an opportunity to react and change.