Social Media Marketing Quick Tips

 

How do you feel about your social media marketing? Are you feeling on top of it all or way behind? Here’s an overview of what you need to do. Cover these basics and you are in a good position to accomplish your marketing goals on social.

Be on the “Right” Social Channels

The right places to be are the places where your target customer or audience hangs out. There’s no need to be on Pinterest, for example, if the people you want to reach don’t spend any time there.

How do you decide? Pew Internet does great research into who is where on a national basis. Their social media research will give you a good sense of where your target audience is likely to be.

Do some local fact checking. Ask the people you want to engage with. Where are they on social? How often do they use it? What do they like and not like to see?

Bottom line is the right place(s) to be are the platforms that make the most sense based on your industry and audience.

Provide Accurate Profile Information

Once you pick your places to be, you may immediately start thinking about what you will post. That’s not the next step. Completing your profile is the next most important step.

Fill out your profile completely. Add images. Complete all the information fields. Not only does this make your profile look more professional and credible, but this step makes your business easier to find.

Make sure to revisit your profile regularly to make sure it is still complete and accurate. Business details change. And, all of the social channels add options to the basic profile all the time.

Always use all the options to link to your website and other social channels from each profile. The more interconnected you make your online presence, the better.

Post Interesting Content

You need to post content on a regular basis to have any impact on social media. The frequency depends on your type of business and the expectations of the people you want to reach. The content should be a mix of what you want to say and what your audience cares about.

All of your content should support your business goals and reflect your subject matter expertise. Write your content in a conversational way. Social media is a social place – write like you would speak in a face-to-face conversation.

Make Connections

You need to be seen to be effective. Follow fellow businesses, brands and prospects.

Following others shows that you’re an active participant in the social space. Social is all about creating connections and relationships. If you just want to share your latest sales pitch and don’t want to interact, that’s what ads are for.

Follow competitors, industry leaders, customers, and prospects, to see how others operate on social media. Most networks offer follower suggestions to get you started and keep your network growing.

Know Who Is Talking About You and Get Involved

Have a way to monitor for mentions of you and your brand. Timeliness is very important, especially when it comes to customer service.

Most platforms have a search function. You can also use tools like Hootsuite, Mention and Sprout Social to find mentions.

Respond to both positive and negative mentions. It is important to not let inaccurate information go uncorrected. Fans and detractors alike will appreciate knowing you take the time to react to their postings.

Promote your Social Channels

Help people find you on social. The more connections you have, the more impact your efforts there will have.

Some places you can hype up your profiles include:

  • Signage in your store
  • Website links
  • Email signature
  • Email newsletter
  • Business cards
  • Paid ads

Facebook and Lessons in Relationships

I regularly help clients use Facebook effectively. My approach is always to help them build relationships with their target audience. That’s getting harder on Facebook, because the platform seems to have forgotten the value of relationships.

Any good relationship is built on trust. The expectation is that the other party will respect the parts of yourself you chose to share with them. When they don’t, you have two choices: give them a second chance or end the relationship.

Facebook’s relationship with some of its users has gone downhill since the 2016 presidential election. The news was bad through 2018 and things aren’t looking much better in 2019.

A recent Pew Research study found that 54 percent of all Facebook users over the age of 18 have increased their privacy settings, while 42 percent have taken a break from the platform for several weeks or longer.

These percentages increase in younger users, who increasingly seem to be breaking up with Facebook. According to Pew:

  • 44% of users between 18 and 29 have deleted the app from their phone
  • 64% of younger users have tightened their security

While a number of Facebook users remain, it’s clear that the social network will have to take some measures to earn back the public’s trust. In the meantime, marketers need to pay attention to how this impacts their efforts. If their core audience is migrating away from Facebook and toward other options, their strategy needs to do the same.

Keep Your Content Simple

Guest Post by Amy Newton

Everyone who owns a business wants to tell the world about it. Sometimes, owners want to tell the world so much about what they can do, what they have recently done, and so on, that their websites or brochures are crammed full of content. While there isn’t any harm in writing about your services, expertise, and accolades, especially to help bolster business, is that all really necessary? Can the content be scaled down to get to the core — the “meat” — of what you do?

There isn’t any judgment about your writing here. We have all used business jargon, too many adjectives, and too many words in general. Whether you are writing text for a brochure or your website, getting to the point of what your company does and offers is achievable.

Plan your content

Let’s start with the nuts and bolts of your marketing material before we talk clutter. Think about the communication form you will be using and the information you want to provide to your potential customer. For brochures, decide if you need an eight-page, stapled booklet or an 8.5×11 sheet. If you are creating or refreshing a website, decide how many menu pages are necessary to focus on your company.

For either project, you will want to separate your content into pages or sections that are easy to identify. Titles/headers and lists are simple ways to break up paragraphs of text.

Keep it Simple

Once you have decided on the size of the printed material and/or menu of your website, text is next. Strike the balance of giving your client enough information about your company, while not making them click away because of text overload. A simple way to do this is to categorize what you want to include:

  • Need to Have
  • Nice to Have

Need to Have information is easy to identify. This can include: a brief overview of your company, the services or products your company offers, years of service/expertise, and company contact information.

Nice to Have information is the content that is extra padding. This includes: testimonials or recommendations, bios of team members, lengthy photo galleries or galleries that show projects many years old.

It isn’t wrong to include any of the information in the Nice to Have category. You will just need to be stronger with your editing because these areas can get unwieldy.

Keep in mind when writing content for your website on how it will translate to other devices. If you have to scroll down several times when reading your text on a desktop computer, think about how much scrolling one will have to do from a mobile device. While some are more willing to scroll for a little while, nobody likes to scroll forever.

Before you Post or Print 10,000 Copies

When in doubt if your content is clean and simple, take a step back, get a cup of coffee, and come back to review your text. Chances are you will find a sentence or two, or maybe a paragraph, that can be edited or deleted altogether. Time is valuable. Get to the point so that your potential customer can find what they need and contact you to get started.